Great Books

AnnaQuindlenColorBlack and Blue by Anna Quindlen

dream-retreatThe Artist’s Way:  A Spiritual Path to Higher Creativity:  A Course in Discovering and Recovering Your Creative Self  by Julia Cameron

p10000821The Persian Pickle Club by Sandra Dallas

 

  Sophie Littlefield’s A BAD DAY FOR SORRY

   Outrageous Acts and Everyday Rebellions and Revolution from Within: A Book of Self-Esteemby Gloria Steinem 

 

Alice Miller Alice Miller wrote:  

  • The Body Never Lies: The Lingering Effects of Hurtful Parenting
  •  The Truth Will Set You Free: Overcoming Emotional Blindness and Finding Your True Adult Self
  • Breaking Down the Wall of Silence: The Liberating Experience of Facing Painful Truth
  • The Drama of the Gifted Child: The Search for the True Self
  • Banished Knowledge: Facing Childhood Injuries
  • The Untouched Key: Tracing Childhood Trauma in Creativity and Destructiveness
  • Thou Shalt Not Be Aware: Society’s Betrayal of the Child
  • For Your Own Good
  • Hidden Cruelty in Child-rearing and the Roots of Violence

Harbor Lady by Carole MayKeeping the Faith: Guidance for Christian Women Facing Abuse by Marie M. Fortune

 

 Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert

6 responses to “Great Books

  1. My material is copyrighted. Permission to use copyrighted material for educational purposes is not required. However, it is a good idea to cite sources to avoid charges of plagiarism.

    Good luck!

  2. Anne … I haven’t read Woo’s book yet. Just saw a review in last Sunday’s Post — The Washington Post. The review is titled “A marriage shaken apart.” Book is “THE GREAT DIVORCE: A Nineteenth-Century Mother’s Extraordinary Fight Against Her Husband, the Shakers, and Her Times” by Ilyon Woo. The reviewer is Elaine Showalter. Elaine finishes “…it is hard to say whether [Eunice’s] victory was unbiased and honorable, let alone exemplary.” I would love to see, here, your review of Great Divorce. I think you would arrive at a conclusion very opposite from Elaine. And just imagine how much more a fighter like Eunice Chapman would have accompished in our electronic times?

  3. Eunice,

    VERY interesting. Thanks for your comment and alerting me to this book.

    I’ve read the review and was blown away that her battle to get her kids was in many respects easier than it is for many PAS mothers today. Claudine Dombrowski, for example, has been fighting for 14 years to protect her daughter Rikki. It’s pretty depressing that in 1818 Eunice Chapman was able to accomplish this feat in four years.

    Today (Aug. 26) is the 90th anniversary of women’s suffrage. It doesn’t feel like we’ve come a “long way, baby.”

    Women are STILL fighting for the same rights that started the women’s movement. And, if this biography is accurate, we’re in a worse place now than we were then.

    Thank you, Eunice, for focusing me back on my mission. This would be an intriguing story to add to my collection of survivor stories. Hopefully, my local library will have a copy because the price ($25) is daunting.

    Sending hugs,
    Anne Caroline

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